Does Outdoor Photographer Want to Steal Your Work?

Does Outdoor Photographer Want to Steal Your Work?
A juvenile Wilson's plover scampers across a shell laden beach. Wilson's plovers, though considered to be a species of Least Concern on the ICUN Red List of Threatened Species, is being eyed for protection in the United States. Climate change, specifically in the form of rising sea levels, and development are currently threatening the survival of this species who may have only another 20 years before their population begins to collapse. 

Sometimes it’s good to start with a quote. . .

“By submitting an entry, entrant grans the Sponsors and their designees an irrevocable, royalty-free, nonexclusive, worldwide perpetual license to use the entry and his/her name, city and state of residence for credit purposes in Sponsors’ online galleries, without further compensation, notification or permission, unless prohibited by law. In addition, each winner grants to the Sponsors and their designees an irrevocable, royalty-free, nonexclusive, worldwide perpetual license to use and distribute the entry (as submitted, or as cropped by the Sponsors), and his/her name, city and state of residence for credit purposes, in any and all media now or hereafter known, including without limitation in Outdoor Photographer and any Madavor Media magazines for purposes of promotion of this Contest and for publication in Outdoor Photographer’s special contest issue. except as otherwise stated herein, without further compensation, notification or permission, unless prohibited by law.”

The above paragraph is from Outdoor Photographer’s most recent contest announcement. And as is usually the case, details are buried in legalese making it challenging to understand exactly what this means for any photographer who submits images to the contest.