Getting Started with Video (and why you need to do it)

Getting Started with Video (and why you need to do it)
A juvenile barred owl learns to hunt while his parents watch nearby. The dark and mossy forest of Florida is an ideal habitat for these owls. Small rodents, birds, snakes, and other food sources are plentiful, and the thick overstory providesa slight cover of darkness while these crepuscular birds hunt. Photo by: Annalise Kaylor

For professional photographers, learning video is a matter of “when,” not “if.” The latest video marketing survey from WyzeOwl reports that 86% of businesses use video as a marketing tool. What’s more, people watch an average of 18 hours of video online each week and are twice as likely to share video content with their friends and networks than any other kind of digital media. Cisco predicts that by the end of 2022, video will make up 82% of internet traffic.

Many photographers shy away from producing video. It’s easy to understand why — there’s a bit of a learning curve when it comes to editing software, interviewing people, using manual focus, finding music, and learning all of the technical basics. As a photographer myself, I, too, felt overwhelmed by adding video to the mix. Then a full-time video producer said to me, “I don’t know why this is so intimidating to you. As a photographer, you already know so much about what goes into making a video — it’s like you’re halfway there.” He was right.